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Nominations open for Bread and Roses Award 2013

1 Aug

Nominations are now open for the 2013 Bread and Roses Award for radical books published in 2012. The closing date for nominations is January 11 2013.

A shortlist will be announced in March 2013 and the winner will be announced at a one-day event on Saturday May 11 2013 at Conway Hall in London. This will include a Bread and Roses radical book fair, with stalls from radical publishers and booksellers, a cafe, and a series of free events based on the Award shortlist. Further details of this event will be announced later.

We are pleased to announce that Ken Livingstone, former GLC leader and Mayor of London, will join the team of judges for the 2013 Award.

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David Graeber’s ‘Debt: The First 5,000 Years’ wins the first ever Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing

3 May

Bread and RosesIn the centenary year of the infamous Bread and Roses strike, the Alliance of Radical Booksellers is proud to announce the winner of the first annual Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing. David Graeber’s Debt: The First 5,000 Years clinched the prize in the final hour, following a reported deadlock between the guest judges.

 

Debt, by David Graeber (new cover featuring Bread and Roses flash)The judges felt that this brilliantly researched book was

engaging, readable, relevant, motivated by a clear political will, and utterly indispensable, not only for understanding the terms of the world we live in, where they came from, but also for what we do about changing them.

Although academic in its scope and scale, the judges commended Graeber for the quality of the language, and effort to make the ideas accessible and readily comprehensible.

Treasure Islands by Nicholas ShaxsonGraeber’s book narrowly came through after judges struggled to pick a winner between it and Nicholas Shaxson’s Treasure Islands: Tax Havens and the men who stole the world, which they commended for its thoroughness of research, and ‘usefulness’ in the current political climate.

 

 

Nina Power

Nina Power announcing the award winner

The winner was announced at a ceremony on International Workers’ Day, 1st May 2012, at the trade union-run Bread and Roses pub in Clapham. The pub is currently in the middle of a season of cultural events celebrating the centenary of the Bread and Roses strike.

Although based in London and holding the position of Reader in Social Anthropology at Goldsmiths, University of London, David Graeber was unable to collect the prize as he is currently on a research trip in the United States. Bill Godber from Turnaround distributors collected the award and the prize money of £1,000 on his behalf.

Bill Godber collected the prize on David Graeber's behalf

Bill Godber collected the prize on David Graeber’s behalf

The Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing aims to promote the publication of radical books, to raise the profile of radical publishing, and to reward exceptional work. Without being too prescriptive in defining ‘radical’, the shortlisted books are informed by socialist, anarchist, environmental, feminist and anti-racist concerns, and primarily will inspire, support or report on political and/or personal change. They may relate to global, national, local or specialist areas of interest. To be eligible books must have been published in 2011, and the author’s or editor’s primary residence must be in the UK.

This year’s Bread and Roses award was judged by children’s novelist and poet Michael Rosen, lecturer and feminist author Nina Power, and Festival Director of Liverpool’s annual Writing on the Wall Festival, Madeline Heneghan.

Quotes from the Bread and Roses judges

Announcing the winner on behalf of the judging panel, Nina Power said:

The winner of the first Bread and Roses prize for Radical Publishing has written a text that breaks many rules, and does so excellently in each case: this is a book that covers so much material, refers to so many historical periods and geographical spaces, that the reader is dazzled – not only by the easy erudition of the writer but about how much it is possible to learn and with so little pain.

It’s a book that has the appearance – and at 534 pages, literally so – of a fearsome academic tract. But it avoids everything that frequently plagues academic writing: this book is instead engaging, readable, relevant, motivated by a clear political will and utterly indispensable not only for understanding the terms of the world we live in, where they came from, but also for what we do about changing them. It is a book written from the heart, albeit with the aid of a library the size of a palace – a people’s palace, that is!

Nik Gorecki, Nina Power, Mandy Vere

Nik Gorecki (Housmans Bookshop), Nina Power, Mandy Vere (News from Nowhere)

Stop Press: 2012 Winner Announced

2 May

Debt: The First 5000 YearsIn the centenary year of the infamous Bread and Roses strike, the Alliance of Radical Booksellers is proud to announce the winner of the first annual Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing. David Graeber’s Debt: The First 5,000 Years clinched the prize in the final hour, following a reported deadlock between the guest judges.

The judges felt that this brilliantly researched book was “engaging, readable, relevant, motivated by a clear political will, and utterly indispensable, not only for understanding the terms of the world we live in, where they came from, but also for what we do about changing them”.

Although academic in its scope and scale, the judges commended Graeber for the quality of the language, and effort to make the ideas accessible and readily comprehensible.

Graeber’s book narrowly came through after judges struggled to pick a winner between it and Nicholas Shaxson’s Treasure Islands: Tax Havens and the men who stole the world, which they commended for its thoroughness of research, and ‘usefulness’ in the current political climate.

2012 Shortlist Announced

1 Mar

The Alliance of Radical Booksellers is proud to announce the shortlist for the first annual Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing. With a prize of £1,000 for the winning author to be announced on 1st May 2012, the Bread and Roses Award aims to promote the publication of radical books, to raise the profile of radical publishing, and to reward exceptional work.

The shortlist consists of seven books:

Counterpower: Making Change Happen by Tim Gee

Debt: The First 5,000 Years by David Graeber

Tweets from Tahrir: Egypt’s Revolution as it Unfolded, in the Words of the People Who Made it edited by Nadia Idle and Alex Nunns

Chavs: The Demonization of the Working Class by Owen Jones

Magical Marxism by Andy Merrifield

Penny Red: Notes from the New Age of Dissent by Laurie Penny

Treasure Islands: Tax Havens and the Men who Stole the World by Nicholas Shaxson

For more information on all the shortlisted titles, visit our shortlist page.

We’re afloat!

9 Nov

Photographic evidence of the launch event has trickled its way to us. This took place at the Chapter and Verse festival at the wonderful Bluecoat in Liverpool, along with the official launch of the Alliance of Radical Booksellers. Speeches were made, songs were sung (by the Bread and Roses choir), and a fine time was had by all.

Ross Bradshaw announces the award

Ross Bradshaw announces the Bread and Roses award, with the Bread and Roses choir in attendance, and, um, bread and roses

The Bread and Roses choir

The Bread and Roses choir sing The Internationale

Shining in the Morning Star

9 Nov

The Morning Star has printed an article by Ross Bradshaw about the Bread and Roses Award, under the lovely title Radical Rosette. It finishes with a quote from Anne Beech at Pluto Press:

“The prospect of an alliance of radical booksellers awarding a prize is an enticing one, given that they represent some of the most passionate and committed booksellers on the planet!”

2012 Award Ceremony date and venue

4 Oct

We’re delighted to announce that the winner of the first Bread and Roses Award will be announced on May 1st 2012, with the award being presented at Clapham’s Bread and Roses pub – an ideal venue, not just because of the shared name, but because of the pub’s connection with the Workers Beer Company and the Battersea and Wandsworth Trades Union Council, which founded the pub.

Further details to follow…