Guest judges for the Bread and Roses Award 2014

4 Oct

We’re delighted to announce the judges for the Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing 2014.

GUEST_JUDGES_14

Jess McCabe

Jess McCabe is editor-at-large of the F-Word blog, which continues to be highly influential in debates around contemporary feminism. The Guardian listed it as one of The World’s 50 Most Powerful Blogs in 2008, and it continues week-on-week to chart in the Top 50 most visited political blogs in the UK.

Seumas Milne

Seumas Milne is a Guardian columnist and associate editor. He was the Guardian’s comment editor from 2001 to 2007 after working for the paper as a general reporter and labour editor. He has reported for the Guardian from the Middle East, eastern Europe, Russia, south Asia and Latin America.

He is the author of ‘The Enemy Within: Thatcher’s Secret War Against the Miners’ (Verso 2004) and ‘The Revenge of History: The Battle for the Twenty-first Century’ (Verso 2012).

Nina Power

Nina Power is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Roehampton University. She is the author of ‘One-Dimensional Woman’ (Zero Books 2009), co-editor of Alain Badiou’s ‘On Beckett’ (Clinamen 2002), and the author of several articles on European Philosophy, atomism, pedagogy, art and politics.

Nina also writes for several magazines, including New Statesman, New Humanist, Cabinet, Radical Philosophy and The Philosophers’ Magazine. She is reviews editor for The Philosophers’ Magazine and also runs a film club (Kino Fist) in her spare time.

Hsiao-Hung Pai wins the Bread & Roses Award 2013

12 May

We’re delighted to announce that Hsiao-Hung Pai has won the Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing 2013 for her book ‘Scattered Sand: The Story of China’s Rural Migrants’ published by Verso. The announcement was made at the London Radical Bookfair at Conway Hall on Saturday 11th May. Due to ill health Hsia-Hung wasn’t able to attend, and so the award was acceptedon her behalf by Sarah Shin of Verso Books.
scattered_sand-book
In making the announcement guest judge Nina Power described ‘Scattered Sand’ as “a vivid, intimate and highly-engaging picture of work in contemporary China. Pai’s book evidences compassion and passion in equal measure for the workers she talks to, and presents a highly convincing, if often depressing, portrait of rural to urban migration and economic exploitation. Pai’s account is an extremely worthy winner for Bread and Roses, and represents all that is important about radical, cutting-edge writing and publishing: reading Scattered Sand, one is simultaneously informed and impressed by the quality of the research, the humanity of the author and the devastating qualities of the situation she describes.”

The 2013 Shortlist is announced

5 Mar

We are happy to announce the eight book shortlist for the The Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing 2013. The shortlist will now be passed to our guest judges, Nina Power, Laura Oldfield-Ford and Ken Livingstone, with a winner announced at the London Radical Bookfair on May 11th 2013. If you would like to purchase any of these books, please do so at one of the Alliance of Radical Booksellers member shops.

‘What We Are Fighting For: A Radical Collective Manifesto’
edited by Federico Campagna and Emanuele Campiglio
(Pluto, 2012) 

WhatWeAreFightingFor-cover 

The age of austerity has brought a new generation of protesters on to the streets across the world. As the economic crisis meets the environmental crisis, millions fear what the future will bring but also dare to dream of a different society.

What We Are Fighting For tries to answer the question that the mainstream media loves to ask the protesters. The first radical, collective manifesto of the new decade, it brings together some of the key theorists and activists from the new networked and creative social movements. Contributors include Owen Jones, David Graeber, John Holloway, Nina Power, Mark Fisher, Franco Berardi Bifo and Marina Sitrin.

Chapters outline the alternative vision that animates the new global movement – from ‘new economics’ and ‘new governance’ to ‘new public’ and ‘new social imagination’. The book concludes by exploring ‘new tactics of struggle’.

‘No-Nonsense Guide to Equality’
by Danny Dorling
(New Internationalist , 2012) 

equalitypic   

A wide-ranging exploration of why inequality persists and what can be done about it. The No-Nonsense Guide to Equality discusses the positive effects that equality can have, using examples and case studies from across the globe, including many from the UK. It examines the lessons of history and covers race, gender and ethnicity, age, and wealth. Danny Dorling considers, realistically, just how equal it is possible to be, the challenges we face, and the factors that will lead to greater equality for all.

‘A People’s History of the Second World War: Resistance Versus Empire’
by Donny Gluckstein
(Pluto, 2012)

A-People-s-History-of-the-Second-World-War-Gluckstein-Donny-9780745328034  

A People’s History of the Second World War unearths the fascinating history of the war as fought ‘from below’. Until now, the vast majority of historical accounts have focussed on the conflict between the Allied and Axis powers for imperialist mastery. Donny Gluckstein shows that in fact between 1939 and 1945 two distinct wars were fought – one ‘from above’ and one ‘from below’.

Using examples from countries under the Nazi heel, in the colonies and within the Axis and Allied camps, Gluckstein brings to life the very different struggle of the people’s and resistance movements which proliferated during the war. He shows how they fought not just fascism, but colonialism and empire, and were betrayed by the Allies at the war’s end.

This book will fundamentally challenge our understanding of the Second World War – both about the people who fought it and the reasons for which it was fought.

‘Secret Manoeuvres in the Dark: Corporate and Police Spying on Activists’
by Eveline Lubbers
(Pluto Press, 2012)

SecretM 

The exposure of undercover policeman Mark Kennedy in the eco-activist movement revealed how the state monitors and undermines political activism. This book shows the other grave threat to our political freedoms – undercover activities by corporations.

Secret Manoeuvres in the Dark documents how corporations are halting legitimate action and investigation by activists. Using exclusive access to previously confidential sources, Eveline Lubbers shows how companies such as Nestlé, Shell and McDonalds use covert methods to evade accountability. She argues that corporate intelligence gathering has shifted from being reactive to pro-active, with important implications for democracy itself.

Secret Manoeuvres in the Dark will be vital reading for activists, investigative and citizen journalists, and all who care about freedom and democracy in the 21st century.

‘Why It’s Still Kicking Off Everywhere: The New Global Revolutions’ 
by Paul Mason
(Verso, 2012)

Mason

Originally published in 2012 to wide acclaim, this updated edition, Why It’s STILL Kicking Off Everywhere, includes coverage of the most recent events in the wave of revolt and revolution sweeping the planet – riots in Athen, student occupations in the UK, Quebec and Moscow, the emergence of the Occupy Movement and the tumult of the Arab Spring.

Economic crisis, social networking and a new political consciousness have come together to ignite a new generation of radicals. BBC journalist and author Paul Mason combines the anecdotes gleaned through first-hand reportage with political, economic and historical analysis to tell the story of today’s networked revolution. Why It’s Still Kicking Off Everywhere not only addresses contemporary struggles, it provides insights into the future of global revolt.

‘Scattered Sand: The Story of China’s Rural Migrants’
by Hsiao-Hung Pai
(Verso, 2012)

scattered_sand-book

Each year, 200 million workers from China’s vast rural interior travel between cities and regions in search of employment: the largest human migration in history. This indispensable army of labor contributes half of China’s GDP, but is an unorganized workforce – ‘scattered sand’ – and the most marginalized and impoverished group of workers in the country.

For two years, the award-winning journalist Hsiao-Hung Pai traveled across China to uncover the exploitation of workers at locations as diverse as Olympic construction sites and brick kilns in the Yellow River region, the factories of the Pearl River Delta and the suicide-ridden Foxconn complex. She witnessed AIDS-afflicted families and towns; recorded acts of labor militancy; and was reunited with long-lost relatives, estranged since her mother’s family fled for Taiwan during the Civil War. What she finds is a peasantry expected to sacrifice itself for the sake of national glory – just as it was under Mao.

‘Autonomy: The cover designs of Anarchy 1961-1970’
edited by Daniel Poyner
(Hyphen Press, 2012)

autonomy

Prominent among the themes of the journal Anarchy were education, the urban environment, work, workers self-organization, crime, psychology, as well as anarchist traditions and history; attention was given to literature, theatre, and cinema. Although its contributors were many and diverse, Anarchy was essentially the creation of one person, Colin Ward (1924-2010). With this journal, and throughout his work as a writer, editor, and activist, Ward proposed the idea that anarchist principles of mutual aid and autonomous organization outside a centralized state can be achieved here and now and are already at work all around us. The title of this book Autonomy takes up a defining idea of anarchism, as well as using again the word that Colin Ward had intended to be the title of his journal. Autonomy gives attention for the first time to the covers of Anarchy, designed mostly by Rufus Segar.

These little-known covers or wrappers front and back were often conceived as a continuous unit provided the enticing entry to the plain text pages inside. The book reproduces all of them in a sequence that suggests, incidentally, something of the history of graphic design in Britain in those years. The book gives a full picture of Anarchy. Daniel Poyner introduces the journal and its editor, and gives a transcript of his extended interview with Rufus Segar. We reprint a sparkling account of Anarchy by the late Raphael Samuel. The covers and their place in graphic design history are considered by the designer Richard Hollis. To round off the book, a full author and article index of Anarchy is provided. Autonomy writes a new chapter in graphic design history, based in a rich and unexpected source.

‘Alienation: An Introduction to Marx’s Theory’
by Dan Swain
(Bookmarks, 2012)

alienation

We live in a world in which human capacity to transform and control our lives has never been greater. Yet for most people the world is radically outside of their control. Their lives are dictated by the demands of employers and politicians. This is the phenomenon of alienation that the young radical Karl Marx began to diagnose in the early 1840s and remained pre-occupied with throughout his life. This accessible guide to the central aspect of Marx’s philosophy takes the reader through the development of the concept and its relevence today.

Guest judges for the 2013 award

5 Dec

We are happy to be able to announce the full line-up of guest judges for the 2013 award.

GUEST_JUDGES_13
Nina Power

Dr Nina Power is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Roehampton University. She is the co-editor of Alain Badiou’s ‘On Beckett’ (Clinamen), and the author of many articles on European philosophy, atomism, pedagogy, art and politics. Her book ‘One-Dimensional Woman’ was published in 2009 by Zero Books.

Nina’s writing has appeared in magazines including New Statesman, New Humanist, Cabinet, Radical Philosophy and The Philosophers’ Magazine. She is reviews editor for The Philosophers’ Magazine and also runs a film club (Kino Fist) in her spare time. She is based in London.

Ken Livingstone

Ken Livingstone has twice held the leading political role in London local government, first as the Leader of the Greater London Council from 1981 until the Council was abolished in 1986, and then as the first elected Mayor of London from the creation of the office in 2000 until 2008. He also served as Labour MP for Brent East from 1987 to 2001.

Laura Oldfield Ford

Laura Oldfield Ford, originally from Halifax, West Yorkshire, studied at the Royal College of Art and has become well known for her politically active and poetic engagement with London as a site of social antagonism. She exhibits and teaches across Europe and America.

A compendium of her ‘Savage Messiah’ zines has been published by Verso Books. Part graphic novel, part artwork, the book is both an angry polemic against the marginalization of the city’s working class and an exploration of the cracks that open up in urban space.

Nominations open for Bread and Roses Award 2013

1 Aug

Nominations are now open for the 2013 Bread and Roses Award for radical books published in 2012. The closing date for nominations is January 11 2013.

A shortlist will be announced in March 2013 and the winner will be announced at a one-day event on Saturday May 11 2013 at Conway Hall in London. This will include a Bread and Roses radical book fair, with stalls from radical publishers and booksellers, a cafe, and a series of free events based on the Award shortlist. Further details of this event will be announced later.

We are pleased to announce that Ken Livingstone, former GLC leader and Mayor of London, will join the team of judges for the 2013 Award.

David Graeber’s ‘Debt: The First 5,000 Years’ wins the first ever Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing

3 May

Bread and RosesIn the centenary year of the infamous Bread and Roses strike, the Alliance of Radical Booksellers is proud to announce the winner of the first annual Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing. David Graeber’s Debt: The First 5,000 Years clinched the prize in the final hour, following a reported deadlock between the guest judges.

 

Debt, by David Graeber (new cover featuring Bread and Roses flash)The judges felt that this brilliantly researched book was

engaging, readable, relevant, motivated by a clear political will, and utterly indispensable, not only for understanding the terms of the world we live in, where they came from, but also for what we do about changing them.

Although academic in its scope and scale, the judges commended Graeber for the quality of the language, and effort to make the ideas accessible and readily comprehensible.

Treasure Islands by Nicholas ShaxsonGraeber’s book narrowly came through after judges struggled to pick a winner between it and Nicholas Shaxson’s Treasure Islands: Tax Havens and the men who stole the world, which they commended for its thoroughness of research, and ‘usefulness’ in the current political climate.

 

 

Nina Power

Nina Power announcing the award winner

The winner was announced at a ceremony on International Workers’ Day, 1st May 2012, at the trade union-run Bread and Roses pub in Clapham. The pub is currently in the middle of a season of cultural events celebrating the centenary of the Bread and Roses strike.

Although based in London and holding the position of Reader in Social Anthropology at Goldsmiths, University of London, David Graeber was unable to collect the prize as he is currently on a research trip in the United States. Bill Godber from Turnaround distributors collected the award and the prize money of £1,000 on his behalf.

Bill Godber collected the prize on David Graeber's behalf

Bill Godber collected the prize on David Graeber’s behalf

The Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing aims to promote the publication of radical books, to raise the profile of radical publishing, and to reward exceptional work. Without being too prescriptive in defining ‘radical’, the shortlisted books are informed by socialist, anarchist, environmental, feminist and anti-racist concerns, and primarily will inspire, support or report on political and/or personal change. They may relate to global, national, local or specialist areas of interest. To be eligible books must have been published in 2011, and the author’s or editor’s primary residence must be in the UK.

This year’s Bread and Roses award was judged by children’s novelist and poet Michael Rosen, lecturer and feminist author Nina Power, and Festival Director of Liverpool’s annual Writing on the Wall Festival, Madeline Heneghan.

Quotes from the Bread and Roses judges

Announcing the winner on behalf of the judging panel, Nina Power said:

The winner of the first Bread and Roses prize for Radical Publishing has written a text that breaks many rules, and does so excellently in each case: this is a book that covers so much material, refers to so many historical periods and geographical spaces, that the reader is dazzled – not only by the easy erudition of the writer but about how much it is possible to learn and with so little pain.

It’s a book that has the appearance – and at 534 pages, literally so – of a fearsome academic tract. But it avoids everything that frequently plagues academic writing: this book is instead engaging, readable, relevant, motivated by a clear political will and utterly indispensable not only for understanding the terms of the world we live in, where they came from, but also for what we do about changing them. It is a book written from the heart, albeit with the aid of a library the size of a palace – a people’s palace, that is!

Nik Gorecki, Nina Power, Mandy Vere

Nik Gorecki (Housmans Bookshop), Nina Power, Mandy Vere (News from Nowhere)

Stop Press: 2012 Winner Announced

2 May

Debt: The First 5000 YearsIn the centenary year of the infamous Bread and Roses strike, the Alliance of Radical Booksellers is proud to announce the winner of the first annual Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing. David Graeber’s Debt: The First 5,000 Years clinched the prize in the final hour, following a reported deadlock between the guest judges.

The judges felt that this brilliantly researched book was “engaging, readable, relevant, motivated by a clear political will, and utterly indispensable, not only for understanding the terms of the world we live in, where they came from, but also for what we do about changing them”.

Although academic in its scope and scale, the judges commended Graeber for the quality of the language, and effort to make the ideas accessible and readily comprehensible.

Graeber’s book narrowly came through after judges struggled to pick a winner between it and Nicholas Shaxson’s Treasure Islands: Tax Havens and the men who stole the world, which they commended for its thoroughness of research, and ‘usefulness’ in the current political climate.

2012 Shortlist Announced

1 Mar

The Alliance of Radical Booksellers is proud to announce the shortlist for the first annual Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing. With a prize of £1,000 for the winning author to be announced on 1st May 2012, the Bread and Roses Award aims to promote the publication of radical books, to raise the profile of radical publishing, and to reward exceptional work.

The shortlist consists of seven books:

Counterpower: Making Change Happen by Tim Gee

Debt: The First 5,000 Years by David Graeber

Tweets from Tahrir: Egypt’s Revolution as it Unfolded, in the Words of the People Who Made it edited by Nadia Idle and Alex Nunns

Chavs: The Demonization of the Working Class by Owen Jones

Magical Marxism by Andy Merrifield

Penny Red: Notes from the New Age of Dissent by Laurie Penny

Treasure Islands: Tax Havens and the Men who Stole the World by Nicholas Shaxson

For more information on all the shortlisted titles, visit our shortlist page.

We’re afloat!

9 Nov

Photographic evidence of the launch event has trickled its way to us. This took place at the Chapter and Verse festival at the wonderful Bluecoat in Liverpool, along with the official launch of the Alliance of Radical Booksellers. Speeches were made, songs were sung (by the Bread and Roses choir), and a fine time was had by all.

Ross Bradshaw announces the award

Ross Bradshaw announces the Bread and Roses award, with the Bread and Roses choir in attendance, and, um, bread and roses

The Bread and Roses choir

The Bread and Roses choir sing The Internationale

Shining in the Morning Star

9 Nov

The Morning Star has printed an article by Ross Bradshaw about the Bread and Roses Award, under the lovely title Radical Rosette. It finishes with a quote from Anne Beech at Pluto Press:

“The prospect of an alliance of radical booksellers awarding a prize is an enticing one, given that they represent some of the most passionate and committed booksellers on the planet!”